Nanny Knows Best

Nanny Knows Best
Dedicated to exposing, and resisting, the all pervasive nanny state that is corroding the way of life and the freedom of the people of Britain.

Tuesday, April 10, 2007

Prat of The Week

Prat of The WeekHaving had a most indulgent Easter, I feel suitably enthused to award another of my prestigious "Prat of The Week" Awards.

This week it goes to Nanny's armed forces minister, Des Browne. Des has had something of a bumpy ride over the past few weeks, and has managed to massively mismanage the situation in spectacular fashion.

Firstly, 15 service personnel were kidnapped by the Iranians and publicly paraded to the world's media, capitulating and apologising for their alleged "transgressions".

Quite how it is that their support ship and support helicopter did not provide them with support, warn them of the approach of the Iranians and then protect them is beyond me.

May we expect Nanny to provide us with a public explanation of this shameful debacle?

May we fark!

Then, as if the humiliation were not bad enough, Degsey allowed these 15 people to sell their stories to the media.

The fact that up until now people serving in the armed forces have been forbidden from selling their stories, unless they were recounting a tale of spectacular heroism (I don't think our 15 can claim that), seems to have escaped Degsey.

It also seemed to have escaped his notice that our guys are getting shot at and killed on a regular basis in Iraq, and that selling stories is highly offensive to those on active duty and their families.

However, Degsey was not finished in digging an early grave for himself, he has now banned serving personnel from selling their stories. Two of the 15 have already done so, but the remaining 13 will not be able to.

Is this man a prat, or what?

Feel free to drop him a note browned@parliament.uk

3 comments:

  1. I seem to recall that 'Des' has managed to make a bit of a prat of himself on occasion before.

    To be fair I rather like the idea of the captives filching some money from ITV and the rest of the media of they can. After all the media sell on the basis of the free news they obtain from the crises proffered and it would be good to see them pay for some serious news - well, more serious than the celebrity codswallop they normally shell out large sums for.

    Of course personal profitability is a bit less acceptable in the circumstances but I see little harm in a deal whereby the majority of the cash goes to support those who have been maimed and injured or the families of those killed in the conflicts. The person whose story is reported could take perhaps a 10% cut as an injured party in a situation like the most recent one. That would be their compensation in line with support they help to make available to others. The figures may vary according to circumstances.

    That way the media would have a means to justify spending the cash they seem to claim the forces should be able to claim from their involvement (though of course from the taxpayer masquerading as 'government') and it would be in everyone's interest to keep the amount high to maximise the compensation. The secondary benefit being, presumably, to reduce the amount of cash available for the likes of Liz Hurley and her wedding, the Beckhams and Rooneys of this world and the purchase and promotion of B'liar's memoirs post ejection.

    Well, I can dream can't I?


    Grant

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  2. Simon The Horrible12:39 AM

    Ken,

    Calling this man a prat is a disservice to prats, everywhere.

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  3. Lord of Atlantis3:55 PM

    During World War 2, many men and women gave their lives in the cause of freedom whilst many others survived but only after horrendous treatment inflicted upon them by both the Germans and the Japanese, as a result of which a very large number never fully recovered either physically or mentally. However, they would never have dreamed of selling their stories to the press, as they were, in my opinion, men and women of much greater moral fibre than these 15. In any case, I understood that service personnel were required to keep silent through having signed the Official Secrets Act. Clearly Des Browne and his master have made not one, but several monumental cockups over the whole affair from beginning to end, and if they possessed one iota of honour they would resign immediately: however, I'm not holding my breath!

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