Nanny Knows Best

Nanny Knows Best
Dedicated to exposing, and resisting, the all pervasive nanny state that is corroding the way of life and the freedom of the people of Britain.

Monday, February 02, 2009

Hoisted By Her Own Petard

Hoisted By Her Own Petard
Poor old Nanny "Smiler" Brown hoisting herself by her own petard (shades of Mussolini spring to mind) by having her oft repeated, and nasty "Little Englander", phrase "British jobs for British workers" thrown back at her by the wildcat strikers.

The sure sign of a dictatorship is when a government plays the "race card" and pretends to "protect" its nationals from "foreigners".

Like it or not we live in a global economy, Nanny's attempts to pretend that she cares about us (wrt subjects that really matter, eg jobs etc) have been shown to be the hollow fallacies that they really are.

In truth that is often why she tries to divert our attention with her meaningless, yet dangerous) health and safety initiatives, and campaigns against conkers, hot water, door mats, salt, smoking, drinking etc.

She is a powerless old crone, intent on staying in orifice long past her sell by date.

Visit The Orifice of Government Commerce and buy a collector's item.

Visit The Joy of Lard and indulge your lard fantasies.

Show your contempt for Nanny by buying a T shirt or thong from Nanny's Store.

www.nannyknowsbest.com is brought to you by www.kenfrost.com "The Living Brand"

Celebrate the joy of living with champagne. Click and drink!

Why not really indulge yourself, by doing all the things that Nanny really hates? Click on the relevant link to indulge yourselves; Food, Bonking, Toys, Gifts and Flowers, Groceries

33 comments:

  1. "Of course we recognise that people, British people, are worried about jobs being taken by workers from other countries. And yes, those workers from other countries are foreigners. But the point is that I am working from the moment I wake up in the morning to ensure that hard working British families are protected from the global downturn which started in America and which is all the fault of greedy bankers who until just last week were my best friends.

    Going on strike and protesting about foreign workers, well, I say to you that that's not the right thing to do and it's not defensible. What we've set up is a process to deal with the questions that people have been asking about what has happened in this particular instance, and to whitewash any little problems.

    When I talked about British Jobs for British Workers, I was not just stealing a policy from the BNP, or trying to get a favourable headline, I was taking about giving people in Britain the skills, so that they have the ability to get jobs which were at present going to people from abroad and actually encouraging people to take up the courses and the education and learning that is necessary for British workers to be far more skilled for the future. This education and training is on top of all my investment in schools and the ever rising and improving examination results, where now every school leaver has 147 GCSE's at A* or better. Luckily I have abolished Boom and Bust so that Britain is uniquely well placed to attract a lot of immigrants keen to get the benefits of living here. And the tax credits as well."

    The Penguin

    ReplyDelete
  2. Anonymous6:15 PM

    Even Tom Harris (who, Labour MP though he is, seems to be a decent guy) is trying to spin it. So, the population of the UK interprets GB's statement one way and three people (Gordon, Tom Harris and Pat McFadden) suggest the 'right' interpretation.

    NuLabour just can't recover from this one..

    http://www.tomharris.org.uk/

    Jay

    ReplyDelete
  3. What about English jobs for English workers, and send the Scottish numskulls back where they belong?

    Regarrison Hadrian's Wall!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Anonymous7:33 PM

    anticant, I'll start packing my bags now. When I get back to Scotland, I'll suggest that all the people from England who've retired there in the hope of free care be packed off back to England. Ditto English workers in Scotland.

    BTW would you dare to call a Chinese, Asian or African a 'numskull' [sic] or do you reserve your illiterate insults for Scots?

    Jay

    ReplyDelete
  5. Only joking, Jay. Some of my best friends are Scots - ask MerkinonParis.

    And I certainly would "dare" to call anyone anything I like if I thought it was justified, not being a PC person.

    At the moment I would call you humourless.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Anonymous10:42 PM

    I have a very sharply-honed sense of humour, anticant, but I am terribly tired of hearing Scots being dissed all the time.

    We've enough to be getting on with trying to fight injustices that affect all of us without this nonsense.

    English people who live in Scotland want to be accepted for the contribution that they make to Scottish society and they resent bigotry. Only a minority will not accept them. I would like the compliment to be returned.

    Jay

    ReplyDelete
  7. Oh dear, what a sourpuss you are! I am not an Englishman living in Scotland: I am an Englishman living in England.

    Joking apart, there are serious political issues about the excessive influence which Scots exercise over UK politics [and have done since 1603], and the dumbing down of English nationalism.

    What is your view on the West Lothian question? Perfectly seriously, if Scotland can have its own parliament, and Wales its Assembly, I think that England should have its own parliament too.

    Or maybe we should bring back the Heptarchy, each kingdom having its own currency, passports and border controls. Now that might be fun...

    ReplyDelete
  8. Oh, and I'm descended from Northumbrian Border Reivers.

    ReplyDelete
  9. grumpy sassenach7:52 AM

    Three Scots I'd be heartily glad to see the back of - no thanks for their "contribution" to our society - are Blair, Brown and Darling.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Anonymous8:45 AM

    "English people who live in Scotland want to be accepted for the contribution that they make to Scottish society and they resent bigotry. Only a minority will not accept them. I would like the compliment to be returned."

    Yeah, well thanks a heap for Brown and Darling. Shall we treat the Scots with the same respect that pair have shown to us?

    ReplyDelete
  11. Tom Harris claims that The Fifeshire Feartie meant :'. . he meant: that British workers have the right to expect that they will have sufficient skills to compete on an equal basis with foreign workers.'

    Good try Tom but that is not what he said.

    PS dear 'anonymous', I can indeed confirm that my good friend AntiCant may be descended from a tribe of Northumbrian sheep-shaggers but is welcome in sunny Dunoon at any time.

    Plus ça change...plus c'est la même chose

    ReplyDelete
  12. Lord of Atlantis1:21 PM

    anticant said...
    "What about English jobs for English workers, and send the Scottish numskulls back where they belong?
    Regarrison Hadrian's Wall!"

    And the Antonine Wall too, for good measure, and to make sure!

    ReplyDelete
  13. I don't think the Reivers shagged sheep - they raped women and stole cattle.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Seriously, isn't it about time we abandoned the PC refusal to question the virtues of globalism, free trade etc. and had a sensible discussion about the possible merits of limited protectionism in safeguarding our national economy?

    Remembering the 1930s, the Depression in Britain didn't begin to lift until the National Government imposed selective tariffs under the supervision of the Import Duties Advisory Committee.

    I don't agree with all that the predictably reviled strikers are saying, but at least they are taking the political initiative back to the vocal electorate where it rightly belongs, and away from the chatterers of the Westminster goldfish bowl.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Anonymous6:28 PM

    anticant, sorry if I've given the impression of being po-faced about this but when was the last time you saw Brown criticised without reference to his nationality (whereas you'll never hear Scots refer to English MPs' nationality although many of them are tossers!)? ...and Scots get accused of anti-Englishness!!

    As for the West Lothian question, I can understand the resentment - it's the same resentment that Scots felt at centuries of being ruled from London...

    If you haven't aready done so, accept Merkin's invitation to visit Dunoon and meet some hospitable Scots (but don't go to Castle Douglas in the Borders - it's full of English people!)

    Jay

    ReplyDelete
  16. Tonk.8:07 PM

    There is an old tactic known as divide and rule.

    I suspect Nanny loves seeing the English arguing with the Scots, as she knows a divided nation is easier to dominate. She also likes to see the Welsh arguing with the English and the Scots arguing with the Welsh. She loves to see a divided nation as it will be easier to assimilate us into the EUSSR if we don't stick together.....I am an Indigenous Islander, I am both English and British and proud of being so. I have friends that are Scotish, others that are Welsh, and English ones too. I have met nice people within all of these nationalities, as well as obnoxious ones. Petty squabling amongst ourselves only plays into Nanny's hands. As a single United Kingdom we are strong, as small insignificant separate nations, we are weak.

    ReplyDelete
  17. "As a single United Kingdom we are strong, as small insignificant separate nations, we are weak."

    Tonk - don't you think the same line of reasoning might apply to the EU? Actually, I believe in Federalism as the most likely route to UK, Continental, and ultimately global harmony.

    Jay - Alas, I'll never see Scotland again, because of age, poor health, and very limited mobility. But I've spent some glorious holidays there [Edinburgh, Central Highlands, West Coast and Hebrides, and once in a cottage on a Caithness grouse moor] and have some dear Scottish friends.

    I've also known a few North British pains in the neck, but such sad folk are everywhere, aren't they?

    I can assure you that Scotland has a very warm place in my heart, and my concerns are political, not personal.

    I should warn you, though - as I have already stated on his blog - that anyone spending time with Merkin would be well advised to possess a majority shareholding in a single-malt distillery....

    ReplyDelete
  18. Anticant:

    I do not believe the same reasoning can be applied to the EUSSR.

    The cultures within each of the member countries of the United Kingdom are very similar and in general terms, share the same history.
    There appears to me to be major differences between the cultures of the member countries of the UK and those of the rest of Europe, even between countries within mainland Europe that share boarders.

    I feel that a lesson can be learned from our nation's history namely, that when one forces un-natural borders, cultures etc etc onto land areas, one ends up with the type of problems that we currently see in parts of Africa, the Middle East, some parts of Europe and other parts of Asia. These areas were divided up during colonial rule without much attention being paid to the types of real differences previously mentioned.
    I fear the same type of un-rest will occur if we head towards a federalist Europe...The ground work is already being done by Nanny in so far as she is removing much of our culture and diluting our national identity, often under the banner of multi-culturism etc.

    I don't know what the answer is regarding Europe but, in 1972 we voted in favour of a free trading block not a giant socialist super state....If that is what Nanny wants, then she should ask the people and I suspect we would say no, hence why she won't ask.

    ReplyDelete
  19. AntiCant, we are a wee bit too far gone for the polite political discourse that you seek.

    http://stefzucconi.blogspot.com/

    Have a look at the past articles to see what is actually going on.

    Two years ago when I advised the family members that Northern Wreck was about to go tits up they looked at me as though I was a loony.

    Similarly, with HBOS - who have my account - I gave them a heads up about 18 months ago.

    Plenty of people have been able to divine what is going on but MSM have not been our sources.

    The 'posting' of foreign workers has been going on for some time but the Beeb etc have only now been given the go-ahead to make it a major story.

    The government has very good reasons for injecting further fear into the collective psyche.

    Be sure it is piss all to do with British jobs or British workers.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Tonk and Merkin -

    If I have to be part of a larger culture, I prefer many aspects of European culture - which is civilised in at least some respects, and part of our history - to being a dumbed-down accessory of the USA, which has no culture worth speaking of.

    The crisis we are currently in is not merely economic and financial: it is moral [lack of honesty] and cultural [lack of nerve].

    "when one forces un-natural borders, cultures etc etc onto land areas, one ends up with the type of problems that we currently see in parts of Africa, the Middle East, some parts of Europe and other parts of Asia."

    And also here. The crucial issue is that "multiculturalism" has been a dismal failure, and it is time to reassert the superiority of our indigenous British culture, and to require those who choose to come here from overseas, and their descendants, to abide by it and not to attempt to force their alien religious or secular values upon us.

    I was fortunate enough to grow up in a liberal society which has long since been eroded to the point of vanishing. People aged under 50 have little concept of what it meant to be British during WW2 and after. Nanny and her legion of creepy self-important minions telling everyone what to think and what to do down to the smallest detail would have been laughed to scorn by my generation.

    Now we have pathetic county councillors telling us on TV that their schools are closed because of the danger of people slipping on icy pavements. Ye gods! When I was young we were expected to get to school somehow, and the councils to whom we paid rates were expected to grit the pavements.

    Lack of grit - that's the problem!

    ReplyDelete
  21. Anonymous9:03 AM

    anticant, why should we have to formally be part of a larger culture and then have to choose between Europe or the USA? Am I being naive in thinking that an informal agreement to trade should be sufficient or that a formal agreement doesn't have to, and shouldn't, entail a supra-national political body? Why can't we be pro-Europe but anti-EU?

    I still can't understand why successive British governments have so enthusiastically helped the EU to become the super-power that it now is. I don't understand why today, when it would seem that a large majority of the electorate is unhappy with the impact of EU power, this Government refuses to consider withdrawal. Are we not in a position to leave? If so, then the UK, as well as her people, have no freedom left.

    Jay

    PS If I take a crate of 'Highland Park' may I visit Merkin for the day?

    ReplyDelete
  22. Tonk.9:29 AM

    Anticant:

    I too would like to see a return to our old way of life. I too cringe when I hear bearded guardian readers pontificating on matters of diversity, 'elf'n'safety etc etc.
    The problem is we only have ourselves to blame, as we have allowed politicians and those behind the scenes pulling their strings, to run our nation down.

    Being British never meant to go out and get so drunk one would throw up, mug people and damage property etc etc. My generation grew up respecting authority, each other and our elders.

    If people wish to live here then they must change to our ways.....As I have said before; If someone comes into my house as a guest, I do not expect them to want to move my furniture around or decorate my rooms to their taste.

    Sadly though, with the authoritarian left running our education and media since the 196o's, few younger people know what our culture and way of life actually is. We have created a nation of scaredy cats and grasses that are frightened of their own shadows and afraid to say anything to anyone in case it offends. No one, other than bankers, are prepared to take any risk whatsoever these days. I suspect that had Hitler been born sixty years later, we would be speaking German and goosestepping around as we would not have wanted to offend him and, unlike Iraq etc, it may have been a bit risky to fight a modern well organised and equiped army such as the one Mr Hitler had.

    I wish to be neither part of the EUSSR or an American state....I wish to be British and proud which, at the moment for the reasons detailed above, is very difficult.

    ReplyDelete
  23. It isn't a matter of formality - more one of commercial pressures. So far as entertainment, dress styles etc. are concerned, we've been thoroughly Americanised since WW2. I think it is British laziness about learning other languages that is the big psychological barrier to feeling closer to Europeans. And an almost total ignorance of our history.

    I'm anti current EU structures and bureacracy, but- as Churchill did - favour the idea of a European entity that will counterbalance US political and economic influence. I'm not anti-American - I've had some great American friends, but they seem to be the sort who are aware that other places exist beyond the USA.

    Merkin will no doubt speak for himself, but I don't think he will turn an offer like that down! Hope you like rock music......

    Tonk, I entirely agree with you. I'm not anti-Muslims as human beings any more than I'm anti anyone else. But when they demand "Sharia law" and threaten - as Lord Ahmed did last week - to raise a 10,000 strong mob if a film they disapprove of is shown at the Houses of Parliament, I say enough is more than enough.

    Unless at least one of the mainstram parties is brave enough to grasp this nettle, I foresee an upsurge of BNP votes at the next election - which returns us full circle to the original topic of Ken's post.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Anticant:

    Agreed!!

    I have no problem with doing business with Europeans or any one else for that matter.
    I just don't want to be ruled by other states, made up or otherwise.
    One of the many problems with the EUSSR that worries me is the piece in the rules that state we must not put our(The UK) national interests ahead of those of the EUSSR; Who decides what the interests of the EUSSR actually are is another matter.

    During hard times we always see the rise of extremists and to me, the BNP are just another bunch of socialists; They believe in state ownership of most industry, something Labour advocated pre Blair and many still do in private.
    Extremists are dangerous whether they are of the right or the left, assuming that such wings still exist today.

    The problem is as I see it, the main parties use PR companies to canvas opinion and thus come up with the same answers to the questions....They then formulate policies around these answers which tend to be very middle ground. Both parties fight over the middleground and the electorate, in effect, has no real choice. If Labour stepped slightly to the left and my Conservative Party (Under a true Copnservative leader) stepped slightly to the right, we might have a real choice again. Party politics has, in my opinion, destroyed our democracy. The leader of the party in power has become, in effect, an elected dictator pursuing his own agenda inorder to save his own skin. Ie; Putting himself and his party's interests ahead of the country's.

    I suspect we shall see a large rise in the vote share of the BNP, especially in areas where the local population feel they are becoming second class citizens and are not being listened to.

    What amused me was the report into the best way to raise children, they came to the conclusion that the traditional way we raised kids within a loving family based on, what for all intents and purposes, were Christian values, is the best way. Whilst it may be argued by some that there is no place for religion in todays world, it does not mean that there is no place for the values that religion taught us in terms of morality and general decency......I suspect this study cost many millions of pounds....I would have done it for half a crown.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Lord of Atlantis2:37 PM

    Anonymous said...
    "anticant, why should we have to formally be part of a larger culture and then have to choose between Europe or the USA? Am I being naive in thinking that an informal agreement to trade should be sufficient or that a formal agreement doesn't have to, and shouldn't, entail a supra-national political body? Why can't we be pro-Europe but anti-EU?
    I still can't understand why successive British governments have so enthusiastically helped the EU to become the super-power that it now is. I don't understand why today, when it would seem that a large majority of the electorate is unhappy with the impact of EU power, this Government refuses to consider withdrawal. Are we not in a position to leave? If so, then the UK, as well as her people, have no freedom left."

    Because too many of our illustrious leaders are doing, have done, or are hoping to benefit 'very nicely thankyou' from our membership of the EU by getting well-paid jobs there to boss us about and interfere in our lives, not to mention other peoples'.

    Tonk said:
    "I wish to be neither part of the EUSSR or an American state....I wish to be British and proud..."

    Well said, so do I!

    ReplyDelete
  26. 'Are we not in a position to leave? If so, then the UK, as well as her people, have no freedom left.

    Jay

    PS If I take a crate of 'Highland Park' may I visit Merkin for the day?'


    No, we are not in a position to leave.

    IMHO, Mandoinette was brought back, in part, to finagle the next part of the jigsaw - following on from the imminent collapse of the pound.

    No referenda to be allowed.
    Electoral fraud a la Glenrothes.
    etc

    Freedom is a thing of the past in this country.




    (PS 'Highland Park' sounds as nice as it tastes.

    Mailing Address can be found on my own blog!!)

    ReplyDelete
  27. Anonymous7:29 PM

    "No, we are not in a position to leave." (Merkin)

    If the UK said "we're leaving" what action could the EU actually take that could ruin us?

    Jay

    ReplyDelete
  28. Anon, absolutely nothing - but that is not the point.

    We are not going to be in a postion such that our elected dictatorship will ever allow it.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Anonymous9:56 PM

    Merkin, you might as well say then that parties such as UKIP and LPUK should just stop wasting their time and disband now.

    Does anyone know if there's a site on which you can play around with voting scenarios?

    ReplyDelete
  30. Yes, I think they might just as well. Anyone who still has delusions that the UK is in any meaningful sense independent should read the observations of the two High Court judges in the Guantanamo torture case. Whatever Milipede may say, its starkly obvious that this country - under this government, anyway - isn't going to do anything the Americans don't like, and won't even say "boo" to them.

    ReplyDelete
  31. general sherman5:45 PM

    Anticant,
    I am afraid, dear boy, that we are not subservient to the USA as they do not make 80 percent of our laws that we then need to adopt or be fined/imprisoned/dna databased for not complying with.

    We are subservient to the EUSSR so save your ire for that particular institution.

    Perhaps you feel that those nasty yanks handling some scumbag terrorist who happens to hold a British passport is a sign of our 'subservience' well all I can say is at least hey have the guts to deal with them as opposed to letting them loose to claim a nice council house before blowing some more people in London/Manchester/Glasgow to pieces.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Dixon of Dock Green3:14 PM

    The word is "numbskull" not "numskull".

    ReplyDelete
  33. I'm not sure the expression "Hoisted on one's own petard" is understood here, considering the Mussolini picture you posted. The expression means "blown up by one's own bomb."
    From Wikipedia:

    ""Hoist with his own petard"

    If a petard were to detonate prematurely due to a faulty or short slow match, the engineer would be lifted or "hoisted" by the explosion. William Shakespeare used the now proverbial phrase "hoist with his own petard" in Hamlet.

    In the following passage, the "letters" refer to instructions (written by his uncle Claudius, the King) to be carried sealed to the King of England, by Hamlet, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, the latter being two schoolfellows of Hamlet. The letters, as Hamlet suspects, contain a death warrant against Hamlet, who will later open and modify them to instead request the execution of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. Enginer refers to a military engineer, the spelling reflecting Elizabethan stress.

    There's letters seal'd: and my two schoolfellows,
    Whom I will trust as I will adders fang'd,
    They bear the mandate; they must sweep my way
    And marshal me to knavery. Let it work;
    For 'tis the sport to have the enginer
    Hoist with his own petar; and 't shall go hard
    But I will delve one yard below their mines
    And blow them at the moon: O, 'tis most sweet,
    When in one line two crafts directly meet.

    After modifying the letters Hamlet escapes the ship and returns to Denmark. Hamlet's actual meaning is "cause the bomb maker to be blown up with his own bomb", metaphorically turning the tables on Claudius, whose messengers are killed instead of Hamlet. Also note here, Shakespeare's probable off-color pun "hoist with his own petar", i.e., flatulate, as reason for the spelling "petar" rather than "petard"."

    ReplyDelete