Nanny Knows Best

Nanny Knows Best
Dedicated to exposing, and resisting, the all pervasive nanny state that is corroding the way of life and the freedom of the people of Britain.

Saturday, January 05, 2008

The Dangers of Snow

The Dangers of SnowOK folks, where the fark has all this snow that we were promised in London by Nanny's chums in the media gone then?

Not one flake has fallen in Croydon.

Yet the media were working themselves up into a veritable wank fest over this a couple of days ago. I even saw some hapless reporter from Auntie (the BBC) reporting live from Crystal Palace, saying that the first flakes were falling there; he was almost jumping up and down with excitement.

What a load of hysterical nonsense.

My useless council even had their gritters out (WARNING - do not attempt to take your gritters out in public, unless you have written permission from a doctor).

Nanny really has turned us into a nation of scared pussies.

7 comments:

  1. "Nanny really has turned us into a nation of scared pussies."

    I suspect the reason for this is that scared people are easier to control and manipulate.
    Look at Nanny's behaviour in relation to terrorism....scare us silly so we will accept even more losses of freedom.
    Climate change(pass the sick bag please) and 'Elf'n'Safety are other examples where Nanny uses fear to control and pacify us.

    Makes you proud to be British doesn't it!!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Grant5:00 PM

    Well, I 'm about 120 miles form London and 150 miles from Croydon using what passes for out highway system these days. Not seen any obvious snow since November - assuming you and the BBC chappie are referring to the weather variety. I suppose it is entirely possible that the BBC chap was referring to the other sort.

    We did have a short but sharp hail storm this afternoon. Not cold enough for it to hang around though.

    Does that count?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Anonymous6:39 PM

    I didn’t know what to make of it.

    On BBC Radio they were forecasting snow in my area for Thursday whereas on the BBC web site it claimed it would be relatively mild and dry.

    I was prepared for snow given that their web forecast is usually wrong. But no, it turned out to be relatively mild and dry.



    PS Before submitting this comment I’ve just checked the BBC web site for their 3hr forecast. Outside it’s relatively mild and dry but the web site says it’s raining.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Anonymous8:47 PM

    Further to my snow posting above:

    I know this may be off topic but it’s a sign of the times.

    I drove into London today to collect tickets I’d booked for the British Museum’s ‘First Emperor’ exhibition. That’s the one that’s so popular, the Museum now stays open late to meet demand. Nonetheless, in December I could only get a 10 minute slot for a late evening in March.

    Anyhoo, not being the type to wait for things to go pear-shaped at the last minute I decided to pick the tickets up today (Okay £30 petrol, £4 parking and all that CO2 to collect a £12 ticket but who cares?).

    Put my credit card in the ticket machine – “That card has not been used to purchase a ticket”.

    On the assumption that technology will go pear-shaped when you need it most I also brought the unique booking reference – “That booking reference is not recognised”.

    Went to the girl at the desk to explain.

    “No follow me. You have to enter your reference in the machine.”
    “I’ve done that. It won’t accept it.”
    “Is it for today?”
    “No.”
    “Ah! It only gives out tickets on the day.”
    “Can I collect the tickets at your desk?”
    “No. It’s a completely separate system.”

    To use one of Ken’s phrases: who the fark would sit down and design a machine that can’t handle anything further than 24hrs into the future!!!

    And why couldn’t they have said on their web site that you can’t collect tickets in advance!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Simon The Horrible11:04 PM

    They can't get the forecast right one week in advance, but they expect me to believe this global warming shiite?

    ReplyDelete
  6. Anonymous,

    Are you telling us that you are prepared to pay £12 for 10 mins in a museum during a late evening next March?

    I'm very much afraid that I think that is insane. It would be insane if you lived next door and could pop round in your slippers during 'Celebrity Egg Laying' or something. But to have to travel a fair distance to get there as well is, to my mind, bizarre.

    However, I tend to agree with you about the ticketing system though, considering my other comments, the concept my not be quite as illogical as it first seems. That they don't tell you on the web site that you cannot collect tickets early probably affects very few people - and also saves you the risk of losing the ticket. Indeed it would make more sense of you could print it out at home ...

    However, good on you for ensuring there is adequate CO2 around to, allegedly, heat the planet a little. With the price of heating being being hoisted by the de-Nationalised power industry (None of it seemingly owned by the UK any more) I can only hope that CO2 output IS a contributory factor and that if we pump out enough of it we can reduce the winter heating bills.

    BTW, I used to drive about 25k miles a year but now only about 5k. Can I claim carbon credits? I will happily sell them on at a discounted rate.

    Simon the H:

    No, they don't expect you to believe it. They just want you to feel so overwhelmed by the propaganda that you roll over and pay the taxes, buy the lightbulbs and voluntarily curtail your freedom of movement.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Anonymous11:06 AM

    Grant. You culture vulture you. Yes, I was happily willing to pay £12 for a 10-minute slot in three months time but after checking the museum web site to confirm that they hadn’t mentioned pre-collection, I discovered that the ‘10 minutes’ refers to the window of opportunity for entering the exhibition with a valid ticket. Once in, I can stay until midnight. They quote statistics showing people on average stay one hour.

    Grant! This is an opportunity of a lifetime. People are queuing every morning (probably in their slippers and PJs) outside the British Museum long before it opens, hoping to get one of the 500 tickets sold on the day!

    As for the idea of not giving tickets in advance in case someone might lose them. That’s very Nanny State stuff. The web site states that if a visitor doesn’t present themselves along with their ticket during their allotted 10-minute window, then they’ve blown their opportunity - which I think is right. If I lose my ticket then I deserve all I get. Nature’s way of teaching us how to value something we’ve tried hard to acquire.

    PS The CO2 emissions didn’t seem to do much good. It’s blumin’ cold this morning.

    ReplyDelete