Nanny Knows Best

Nanny Knows Best
Dedicated to exposing, and resisting, the all pervasive nanny state that is corroding the way of life and the freedom of the people of Britain.

Saturday, August 08, 2009

Boycott Asda

Boycott AsdaAsda have joined the ranks of supermarkets who choose to add to Nanny's rules and regulations wrt booze.

Mark Brown was shopping with his 15 year old daughter in Asda's Brighton store, and tried to buy some wine. Asda refused to sell it to him, unless she had ID to prove her age.

The fact that the wine was for him was irrelevant to the staff at Asda.

Asda claim that they were "erring on the side of caution in line with national guidelines".

Nonsense, adults are allowed to buy booze!

Would the supermarkets prefer that people keep their kids at home in future, thus depriving them of millions in revenue resulting from the purchase of "I want" items such as sweets?

Boycott Asda to hurt them where it matters, in their pockets.

Visit The Orifice of Government Commerce and buy a collector's item.

Visit The Joy of Lard and indulge your lard fantasies.

Show your contempt for Nanny by buying a T shirt or thong from Nanny's Store.

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20 comments:

  1. Asda do have a warning by their tills that every member of the group will require ID if one member is purchasing alcohol.

    I was quite lucky the otherday as I didn't have mine on me but they didn't ID me or my husband. (I'm only just over 25 which is the age they claim to ID to).

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  2. Nanny has made not just the store liable for selling the "age restricted item" to underage people, but also the checkout drone.
    Nanny and her yes sheep at Asda and other stores should remember it is not illegal yet to give a 15 year old alcohol in your own home with a meal.

    I suspect this is more about getting the public ready for ID cards......Lots of hassle....Only the card accepted as proof of age etc etc, eventually many sheep will say "Baaaa, I will get an ID card as it will make life easier Baaaaa." Once many people do have ID cards, they will them make them compulsory, as there will be fewer people to object and those that have them will chant the, If you've got nothing to hide etc mantra.
    I don't want an ID card, but the card itself is not my main objection, it is the large intrusive database with the fifty pieces of data that comes with the card that I object to.

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  3. pah! Nanny Lidl refuses to sell eggs to teenagers .. .. ..

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  4. Anonymous12:55 PM

    Christ, I'm running out of supermarkets..

    Jay

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  5. microdave2:39 PM

    If it was me in that situation I would be inclined to hit back with the suggestion that I would send my child outside so long as the checkout operator (or the store manager) was happy to shoulder the blame for any unfortunate consequences....

    "Think of the CHEEEELDREN!"

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  6. J, Fritzl2:55 PM

    Ah well, just have to lock the kids in the dungeon before going out shopping for booze.

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  7. Tom H3:18 PM

    To be fair, I already boycott Asda. Mainly because it's the sole recruitment centre for the Jeremy Kyle Show.

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  8. Good link Curmudgeon.

    And I note a sensible comment frmo the Tesco spokesperson as well.

    "A Tesco spokesman said: "We know there will be plenty of times when adults will have under-18s with them when buying alcohol and this remains perfectly legal.

    "It is only against the law to sell an adult alcohol if it is suspected they are buying the alcohol for someone under 18. ""

    Quite why the average checkout operator, who may be under age themselves, should have to make this judgement with the threat of personal penalties for 'getting it wrong' is quite beyond me.

    The circumstances in which this rule might have applied must be rare occurrences other than at known trouble spots in certain parts of certain towns. And even then I doubt the streetlife are usually so dumb that that they make it obvious that they have a patsy set up to feed their booze habit.

    Since these are known trouble spots if anyone wants to do something about them they know where to go and the police should know how to deal with it. The reasons for blanketing the country with ludicrously inappropriate laws as sledgehammers to crack a nut are obviously other than the purpose stated.

    The entire parliament should be made to apologise for introducing such inane laws.

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  9. Curmudgeon:

    A very interesting link....Where he and I would differ, is that I would not have gone back to buy the wine, in fact, I would have tipped everything I had intended to purchase, back onto the checkout belt and left the checkout drone to clear it away.

    All these stories illustrate the problems associated with giving power or responsibility to those that cannot handle them.
    In my opinion, the law should not criminalise the checkout drone if they accidently sell an "age redtricted product" to an underage person, the employer should take the responsibility especially if that drone has neither the inteligence nor ability to handle that reponsibility. It is also dangerous to give power over others to someone that is not used to it nor is sophisticated enough to exercise that power sensibly; Look at the binmen for example and years ago, the council car park attendent with his peaked cap.....The power went to their head.

    As I say, this type of exercise is really there to get us in the right frame of mind to accept ID cards.

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  10. Number 612:23 PM

    Dear Ken, as a discerning shopperI already boycott Chavda and frequent Sainsburys a far superior shopping emporium. The day any monkey at their check out trys this nonsense on is the day I raise merry hell with their managment and refuse to move from the till until the store that I am spending my money with treats me with deference not hostility.

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  11. Anonymous12:27 PM

    Wir sind ein Eu/New Labour your ID card please. Your card is not in order step into the shiny Mercedes with the EU ringpiece of stars on the licence plate now.

    Impossible, just like a single currency for Europe was impossible, just like someone snooping through you bins to tell you how much rubbish you can put out was impossible.

    Of course, cretins here will say it is for our own good and really it is better to be under the heel of the EU then be in charge of our own destiny.

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  12. microdave said..."If it was me in that situation I would be inclined to hit back with the suggestion that I would send my child outside"

    That doesn't work. Since they have seen you with a child they will STILL refuse to provide you the alcohol unless they can ID the child.

    The stupid thing is that most transactions where adults buy booze for children happen with the request being made outside the store and the child never entering the store.

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  13. Unless I get a smile and a cheery "Hello M'Lord" without prompting from the smurf on the checkout they get the full treatment anyway, regardless of length of queue.

    If they throw their offerings down the checkout without proper decorum or too quickly then they get to sit there and wait while I very, very, carefully pack said goods away. Then and only then do I start to offer payment.

    If they check my notes against the light without apologising and explaining then they get to wait while I reciprocate. Every once in a while I reject a banknote anyway, whether it's bogus or not, because this really winds them up.

    If they ever ask for ID or proof of my considerable age (and they have, last time in Sainsburial's for a spoon...) then they summon the manager for me to receive an explanation and then present it.

    The queue behind has yet to injure me physically. On occasion I have received rounds of applause. Only once have I had to leave a trolley full of groceries in the aisle.

    Meet mindless unthinking directly inconvenient stupidity with mindful, well thought-out, discoveniencing direct action... It's the only way.

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  14. Fausty11:57 PM

    Fcuk 'em. Brew your own! It's dead easy.

    Else, don't take minors into the store with you - ' leave 'em in the car.

    Tonk, next, they'll be prohibiting people from selling their garden produce in markets. Where will it all end?

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  15. Anonymous12:07 AM

    That's nothing: I've been ID'd for non-alcoholic beer in ASDA. I asked the assistant why and she said that as the prompt had come up on the till she had no chioce.

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  16. Winston Smith7:16 AM

    Welcome to 1984 comrades. The government (aka the EU)only has your best interest at heart. Now be good little citizens and sign up for your ID cards now so you can buy spoons, victory gin, paper plates, cabbages, anything that nanny decides you can have upon production of your ID. Now, your ID CARD PLEASE, THIS IS NOT IN ORDER STEP INTO THE CAR.

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  17. I recently had a similar thing happen in my local Asda where I was shopping with my six year old daughter. I had purchased a bottle of Glenlivet and it was the first item the till drone removed from the conveyor belt. Next thing I was being asked for proof of age of my daughter as I might be purchasing said alcohol for her. I pointed out that a six year old was probably not going to appreciate a good malt and to stop being so daft. Of course, the drone came out with the usual "Company policy! More than me jobs worth!"

    At this point I simply said "Then I'm afraid I cannot continue with this transaction if you will not serve me!" and walked away leaving about £150 worth of other shopping on the conveyor and a queue of people behind me.

    I know for a fact that most supermarkets are not allowed to return perishable items to the shelves when this happens and about £80 (give or take) of my shopping was perishables so their refusal to sell me Scotch without ID cost them not only my custom but £80 of stock.

    I would suggest that others take a similar approach with all supermarkets. Cause them the maximum of hassle clearing it up and hit them financially. They *might* learn to stop being Nannys little slaves.

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  18. Darn it this leaving stuff at the checkout sounds like fun but my kids are in their 20s.

    I would ask people I see shopping with kids in tow if I could borrow one to take to the checkout ... but I think that idea may be misconstrued in the modern age, even if thoroughly explained.

    So, should I consider attempting to breed once again? Could be expensive. Would need to acquire a new partner and I doubt the existing one would fully approve, at least not without seriously eroding the budget for the project.

    Hmm. How about adoption? If Madonna can do it at her age for whatever purpose she has why not me? I'm only slightly older.

    Actually my younger daughter often does not look her age so perhaps we could just get her some fake under-age ID and have fun with that - or would that be illegal?

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  19. Anonymous12:13 PM

    I have recently joined the ranks of the growing number of UK citizens who appear to be boycotting ASDA for an assortment of reasons.
    My reasons initially are of an extremely personal nature concerning a considerably inappropriate shopping experience. However, after reading and viewing numerous allegations, shocking CCTV footage and undercover 'ops' pertaining to what seems to be quite unprofessional store practice, I no longer wish to make ASDA stores directors any more affluent.
    Perhaps seemingly inappropriate staff behaviour could be blamed upon poor recruitment/training skills at management and personnel level, I couldn't possibly comment.
    Several companies, I modestly include my own among known equally reputable competitors, take full advantage of re-educational programmes as part of their continuous staff/management appraisal process.

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