Nanny Knows Best

Nanny Knows Best
Dedicated to exposing, and resisting, the all pervasive nanny state that is corroding the way of life and the freedom of the people of Britain.

Monday, August 10, 2009

Knobheaded Twats of The Millennium - Tesco

Twats!My thanks to Curmudgeon for alerting us to this story of utter Twattery (ooh...David Cameron's "banned" word!) from the supermarket aisles of Tesco.

Roy Downie, who is disabled, was attempting to buy a bottle of wine at Tesco Portsmouth. He was with his 16 year old daughter (Holly), who helps him carry shopping, because he needs assistance to get it back to his car.

The staff at Tesco refused to serve Mr Downie, because (yes, that's right) they decreed that he may be buying the wine for his daughter.

Mr Downie had to go back to the store, later on his own and buy the wine, and carry it back in the bag between his teeth.

No member of staff from Tesco bothered to help him.

Boycott Tesco!

Tesco, well deserving of my rare but highly prestigious "Knobheaded Twats of The Millennium" Award.

Here's a couple of email addresses, where you can tell them what you think of them:

customer.service@tesco.co.uk

investor.relations@uk.tesco.com

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Visit The Joy of Lard and indulge your lard fantasies.

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13 comments:

  1. Is it just me or have organisations that have done well under Zanu Labour's tenure in office, become more Nanny like and heavy handed in their dealings with the general population?

    Most of the large supermarket chains became big chains by offering their customers what they wanted at a low price and adopting the idea that, the customer is always right.
    My own local Tesco does not stock dripping, but they do stock ghee....Is this done because Nanny Tescos believe I should be cooking my roast potatoes in healthy oil? When I asked one of the Tesco Drones where the dripping was, I was greeted with a look of horror as if I had asked for a pound of heroine!!

    Tescos and their ilk do appear to have enthusiastically embraced Nanny's 'elf'n'safety, do as you're told and we know what's best for you way of thinking. I wonder if this is because they have been promised lucrative contracts by Nanny when her grip on every aspect of our lives has been tightened even more.....Alternatively, perhaps now that the giant supermarket chains have destroyed our local town center and ousted our local specialist shops, she has no competition to worry about and therefore adopts the attitude of take it or leave it......In many areas of the country, people have little real choice but go to one of the major supermarkets as local shops for local people have all but dissappeared. The supermarket all sell the same type of things, all at the same sort of price and all with the same attitude to customer service......The rise of the supermarkets, to some extent, is a metaphor for our political system.....No real choice; all the parties chase the center ground, they all offer similar PC policies and no real choice means no real democracy.....In this situation, just as in the case of the supermarkets, the state can do what it likes as there is no viable alternative.

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  2. Tonk

    Re "a pound of heroin", there was a time when you could buy cocaine in Harrods (it was known as a "Welcome to London" kit) complete with needle etc.

    They stopped selling it around 1912, I think, as the "Prohibition" movement was quite powerful then and they tagged booze and drugs together.

    The result being a massive upsurge in organised crime in the US (when booze was banned there as well).

    Banning things is always so effective!

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  3. Ken;

    You are of course correct.

    I suspect that, if we as a nation didn't make such a fuss over alcohol and remove the perception of it being a forbidden pleasure, then we would not have half the problems we are supposed to have in our city centers......Of course discipline in both the home and schools so that kids are used to dealing with the word no would also help......

    From experience, one of the best ways of getting people to do something is to tell them not to.....

    Nanny's mantra; Ban it, tax it or legislate to make it compulsory!!

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  4. Anonymous11:59 AM

    Tonk, re the political parties all chasing the nanny vote. That is why I no longer bother with any of them and vote UKIP.

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  5. smithy12:03 PM

    I have been boycotting Tesco for a long time now, since you posted a similar tale of woe about them.

    All my family have followed suit, as have my friends, the pub crowd, and my many work colleagues.

    I reckon that just from my passing round the word, and calculating on the basis of only those who DID shop there but no longer do, they are about a quarter of a million quid a year down already - and I'm still passing on the word.

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  6. Tonk.1:21 PM

    Ken;

    Having read today's entry on your blue blog, I am concerned that Nanny may have infiltrated Frost Towers by installing an agent, in the form of a cat, in your home......Please check your cat's collar for hidden cameras etc as Nanny may be gathering evidence against your "Alcohol Filled" lifestyle in order to have you in for re-education:-)

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  7. Lord of Atlantis2:22 PM

    I make a point of not patronising Tesco, a policy I have adopted for some time, for a variety of reasons. This latest incident just confirms my decision.

    You stated, Ken, in the report, "Mr Downie had to go back to the store, later on his own and buy the wine, and carry it back in the bag between his teeth.
    No member of staff from Tesco bothered to help him."

    I thought that everyone, everywhere was supposed to bend over backwards to assist the disabled these days? I wonder if the firm's CEO and the manager of the store in question would have approved if they or one of their family had been treated in this manner? This seems to be a classic example of following the letter of the law, but not the spirit. I am all in favour of preventing those who are underage from buying and drinking alcohol, but it should be done tactfully, and in a compassionate manner.

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  8. Lord of Atlantis2:28 PM

    Tonk. said... "Ken;
    Having read today's entry on your blue blog, I am concerned that Nanny may have infiltrated Frost Towers by installing an agent, in the form of a cat, in your home......Please check your cat's collar for hidden cameras etc as Nanny may be gathering evidence against your "Alcohol Filled" lifestyle in order to have you in for re-education"

    Fear not, Tonk and Ken, if the cat in question is anything like Pippin, a much-loved cat that used to own me, within a couple of days it will have removed the collar, the remains of which which you will find in the garden, in about three pieces!

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  9. Oscar O' Wilde5:13 PM

    My Dear Kenneth, Tescos dear boy, Tescos. Do you imagine for one moment that the sophisticated readership of your fine organ frequent such ghastly places?

    I would not be seen dead in such a place and insist on my provender being delivered from Waitrose at the very least.

    When one lowers oneself to shop with the lower orders one must expect such treatment at the till.

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  10. "..he may be buying the wine for his daughter."

    He is perfectly entitled to buy the wine for his daughter and it is perfectly legal to do so, our children have tried wine at home and I see absolutely nothing wrong with it..... it's these 'RULES' again - always right even when they are nonsense!

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  11. Tonk,

    Apart from conquering the high street and moving it to out of town locations the bigger organisations have made it very difficult for small traders to find suppliers.

    Borrowing a trick from the glory days of Marks & Spencer the big players now either own the production base themselves (in the case of food and the farming industry for example) or have tied suppliers into contracts that make them dependent, just as M&S did with the clothing industry until they started to suffer from poor fashion choices (allegedly) and to look abroad for lower cost suppliers at the same time. Thus ended a large part of the UK clothing manufacturing supply chain almost overnight.

    M&S had many suppliers who had 90% of their production going to that single customer. Even at a lower figure should that major client pull the plug the business is unlikely to survive so all other customers will suffer as well.

    It's all part of the big business planning cartel.

    Of course were it not for the benefits of mass production, on cost of production it not quality, we might not be able to afford to eat at all, let alone drink. Or, more likely, more people would rink and not eat in order to avoid the day to day reality of their situation.

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  12. Anonymous12:47 PM

    Just sent this to Tesco.

    I have read with concern the recent story of a disabled man in Tesco Portsmouth who was refused a wine purchase because his daughter was with him. I use Tesco for my main shopping every week and I would like yoiu to know that if this ever happens to me then I will leave my shopping and clubcard at the till and never return to any Tesco store.
    Anyone buying drink for someone underage is not going to take the child with them to the checkout. If this guidance has been forced on you politically then you should use your political muscles to change it before you lose more custom forever.

    Clubcard Number
    634xxxxxxxxxxxx

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